Alumni Profile: Nina Mann

Infinite Careers is a new collaboration between Career Services (CAPD) and the MIT Alumni Association to explore career paths and the non-linearity of career decision making. Read profiles of alumni with unique career paths, hear their stories and network at a series of talks.

Register to hear Nina speak on campus on Monday, Feb 26 at 6 pm in 1-134.

Nina Mann

Education

headshot of Nina Mann

MIT, SB in Chemical Engineering (2008)
Harvard Medical School, Doctor of Medicine - MD (2013) 

Biography

Nina graduated from MIT in 2008 with a degree in Chemical Engineering. She then went to Harvard Medical School and did her Pediatrics Residency at Boston Children's Hospital. She is now a Nephrology Fellow at Boston Children's Hospital doing both clinical work and research in the genetics of childhood kidney diseases.

Interview

What influenced your decision to major in Chemical Engineering?

I was interested in the research that was being done in the department, particularly the drug discovery research that was done by Professor Langer.

What has been the most rewarding aspect of your career?

Caring for patients and having the opportunity to work with children has been the most rewarding part of my career.

What motivates you to do the work that you do?

Seeing the limitations to current clinical practice strongly motivates the research that we do.

What professional development activities did you participate in when you were in school and early on your career?

I participated in programs like F/ASIP and UPOP while at MIT. Afterwards, attending conferences and building connections with mentors have been very helpful.

Looking back on your experience at MIT, what advice would you give yourself if you knew then what you know now?

I would say to try to enjoy things, travel more while you have the chance. The responsibilities (both in your career and personal life) only increase over time.

What advice would you give to current students that are interested in pursuing a major in Chemical Engineering or career in the medical field?

I felt that as a student, many of my decisions were based on my interactions with people who were just one or two steps ahead of me in their careers, many of whom were still training. It's also important to learn what your life will be like when you have completed your training -- e.g. to talk to attendings, professors, etc. -- as their day-to-day lives are very different.

What do you like to do outside of work (e.g., to relax, for fun, as a hobby, on your free time, etc.)?

I enjoy running and have recently joined a local running team. I've learned to try to make time to go running regardless of how busy work can be, and this has helped tremendously to maintain some work-life balance and sanity.